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How To Make A Perfect Crosswind Landing | Boldmethod

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You’re picking up ATIS on your way in to land. The winds are 23 knots, 40 degrees off runway heading. And your passengers are expecting a landing they can walk away from.

Crosswind landings can be one of the most stressful things for pilots, especially if you haven’t practiced them in awhile. And whether you’re a new pilot just learning to fly them, or a 20 year pilot who hasn’t gotten a lot of practice recently, a little review can go a long way.

When it comes to crosswind landings, there are a couple methods you can use: crab, and wing-low. And there are advantages and disadvantages to both.

Flying The Crab Method

With the crab technique, you fly final approach crabbing into the wind to prevent drifting left or right of centerline. You maintain the crab all the way to your flare, and just before touchdown, you step on the rudder to align your nose with the runway, and use ailerons to prevent drifting with the wind.

The crab technique can be an easy way to maintain centerline on final approach, but it requires quite a bit of judgement and timing to “kick out” the crab just before touchdown. This is the same technique that jets use to land. But there’s a big difference between a 737 and a single-engine piston, and that’s inertia. If a 737 isn’t perfectly aligned with the runway on touchdown, it straightens itself out as the wheels touch down, and it keeps rolling smoothly down the runway. But if your 172 isn’t aligned with the runway at touchdown, you’re going to jump and bounce across the pavement until you are aligned with it. So unless you’re out practicing your crab-to-landing a lot, it can be a tough method to perfect in a light plane.

rudder-usecrab

Flying The Wing-Low Method

In most cases in light aircraft, the wing low method is an easier way to accomplish a smooth touchdown in a crosswind landing. To fly the wing-low method, you use your rudder to line your nose up with the runway, and ailerons to correct for left/right drift all the way from final approach to touchdown. Essentially, you’re slipping the plane through the crosswind in order to keep yourself lined up with the runway from final to touchdown…

crosswind-procedurewheel-order

Source: How To Make A Perfect Crosswind Landing | Boldmethod

Cessna 152 Multiple Spins Recovery (Full HD) – YouTube

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This is a spectacular video of a Cessna 152 recovering from a spin.

Thanks to Cheesecake Nijia and Boldmethod for sharing…

11 Reasons You Should Be A Pilot | Boldmethod

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Have you thought about becoming a pilot? Here are 11 reasons you should start right now.

Source: 11 Reasons You Should Be A Pilot | Boldmethod

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Avoiding Spatial Disorientation On Your Next Instrument Flight | Boldmethod

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Flying through the clouds on an IFR flight can be one of the most exhilarating things you can do. There’s nothing quite like busting in and out of ‘the soup’. Even better, there’s no feeling quite like seeing the runway appear at the end of an instrument approach. But flying through the clouds is not without risk: between 5-10% of all general aviation accidents result from spatial disorientation, and of those accidents, 90% of them are fatal.

Why Disorientation Happens In The Clouds?
Your eyes are your primary sensory input when you’re flying. You look outside, you see which way the sky is pointing, and you adjust your airplane. But all of that falls apart when you’re in the clouds…

Source: Avoiding Spatial Disorientation On Your Next Instrument Flight | Boldmethod

Kick Your Fear Of Stalls With A Falling Leaf | Boldmethod

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Afraid of stalls? You’re not alone. In fact, nearly every student pilot is apprehensive about stalls – especially full stalls.

Source: Kick Your Fear Of Stalls With A Falling Leaf | Boldmethod

Afraid of stalls? You’re not alone. In fact, nearly every student pilot is apprehensive about stalls – especially full stalls.

Think about it… Your stall warning horn’s blaring in the background (a sound that clearly indicates you should stop doing whatever you’re doing), your aircraft’s nose suddenly jerks down and a random wing drops. You try to correct and everything gets worse. No wonder nearly every student pilot has sweaty palms during their first (and second, and third) full power-off stall.

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