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Ready To Take Off

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Ready To Taking Off — The Inspiration Shots

iPhoneOgraphy – 17 Aug 2016 (Day 230/366) Simulation cockpits or simpits are environments designed to replicate a vehicle cockpit. Although many pits commonly designed around an aircraft cockpit, the term is equally valid for train, spacecraft or car projects. By their very nature aircraft cockpits tend to have complex controls, instrumentation, and radios not present […]

Simulation cockpits or simpits are environments designed to replicate a vehicle cockpit. Although many pits commonly designed around an aircraft cockpit, the term is equally valid for train, spacecraft or car projects.

By their very nature aircraft cockpits tend to have complex controls, instrumentation, and radios not present in other types of simulation. Recreating these present specific additional challenges to anyone building a cockpit. Aircraft components are often expensive to purchase, and access to real aircraft cockpits is likely to be restricted due to security concerns, especially in the wake of the 9/11 attacks or if the builder has chosen a current military aircraft.

A way to avoid a lot of the pitfalls is to not replicate a specific aircraft, simply a class of aircraft. Thus creating a generic GA, airliner, or military cockpit, which while it will not have every button or switch of the real aircraft, will have all the key elements for simulation. The other end of the scale is to build an exact 1:1 replica of the real cockpit, utilizing real panels or even a complete cockpit from the chosen plane. All cockpit builds will be somewhere between these two concepts, and even highly accurate replica pits will often make some concessions, if only due to limitations of the simulation software driving them…

via Ready To Taking Off — The Inspiration Shots

Weekly Photo Challenge Morning Journeys with Johnbo

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Port Allen, Hawaii. A favorite coffee mug, a streak of sunlight coming through the bedroom window, roosters that “sound off at 5 AM”. All of these are reminders of a new day, suggests Cheri Lucas Rowlands in this week’s photo challenge, Morning. You can read the entire challenge post here.

via Weekly Photo Challenge – Morning — Journeys with Johnbo

AIRBUS Adverse Weather Operations Windshear Awareness

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via AIRBUS Adverse Weather Operations Windshear Awareness — Egyptianaviators

KEY  FACTOR : 

Flight crew awareness and alertness are key factors in the successful application of windshear avoidance and escape / recovery techniques. This Flight Briefing Note provides an overview of operational recommendations and training guidelines for aircraft operation in forecast or suspected windshear or downburst conditions.

REAL DATA : 

Adverse wind conditions (i.e., strong cross winds, tailwind and windshear) are involved in more than 30 percent of approach-and-landing accidents and in 15 percent of events involving CFIT. Windshear is the primary causal factor in 4 percent of approach-and-landing accidents and is the ninth cause of fatalities.

Defining Windshear : 

Windshear is defined as a sudden change of wind velocity and/or direction.
Windshear occurs in all directions, but for convenience, it is measured along vertical and horizontal axis, thus becoming vertical and horizontal windshear:

Vertical windshear: − Variations of the horizontal wind component along the vertical axis, resulting in turbulence that may affect the aircraft airspeed when climbing or descending through the windshear layer − Variations of the wind component of 20 kt per 1000 ft to 30 kt per 1000 ft are typical values, but a vertical windshear may reach up to 10 kt per 100 ft.
 Horizontal windshear: − Variations of the wind component along the horizontal axis (e.g., decreasing headwind or increasing tailwind, or a shift from a headwind to a tailwind) − Variations of wind component may reach up to 100 kt per nautical mile.
Windshear conditions usually are associated with the following weather situations:

• Jet streams • Mountain waves • Frontal surfaces • Thunderstorms and convective clouds • Microbursts.

MICROBURSTS:

 Microbursts combine two distinct threats to aviation safety :cof

• The downburst part, resulting in strong downdrafts (reaching up to 6000 ft/mn of vertical velocity) •

The outburst part, resulting in large horizontal windshear and wind component shift from headwind to tailwind (horizontal winds may reach up to 45 kt).

Windshear and Aircraft Performance :

Headwind gust instantaneously increases the aircraft speed and thus tends to make the aircraft fly above intended path and/or accelerate ( item 1).

. A downdraft affects both the aircraft Angle-Of-Attack (AOA), that increases, and the aircraft path since it makes the aircraft sink ( item 2).

Tailwind gust instantaneously decreases the aircraft speed and thus tends to make the aircraft fly below intended path and/or decelerate ( item 3).

NOTE: 
Windshears associated to jet streams, mountain waves and frontal surfaces usually occur at altitudes that do not present the same risk than microbursts, which occur closer to the ground.

KEY FACTOR : Flight crew awareness and alertness are key factors in the successful application of windshear avoidance and escape / recovery techniques. This Flight Briefing Note provides an overview of operational recommendations and training guidelines for aircraft operation in forecast or suspected windshear or downburst conditions. REAL DATA : Adverse wind conditions (i.e., strong […]

via AIRBUS Adverse Weather Operations Windshear Awareness — Egyptianaviators

The 7 Hardest Parts About Becoming A Private Pilot 

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Everyone knows that crosswind landings are usually challenging for student pilots. But beyond landings (and money!), there’s a lot about learning to fly that can be pretty tough. Here’s what you should be ready for.

The 7 Hardest Parts About Becoming A Private Pilot

By Swayne Martin

Everyone knows that crosswind landings are usually challenging for student pilots. But beyond landings (and money!), there’s a lot about learning to fly that can be pretty tough. Here’s what you should be ready for…

1) Aircraft Systems
One of the toughest topics for private pilot students is aircraft systems. As less and less people grow up working on cars or around machinery, there’s diminishing knowledge behind what makes that engine turn.Want to know more about the systems and equipment in your aircraft? Dig into your POH and read section 7. Better yet, find a local A&P at your airport and have them walk you through a few systems with the cowling off. Getting hands-on with the equipment behind closed panels is a great way to learn how your airplane flies.

2) The National Airspace System
It’s more than identifying lines of airspace on a sectional chart. You’ll need to know what weather minimums exist at different altitudes (day and night), what your equipment requirements are, and what your communication requirements are.
We can help – give our National Airspace System course a try.

3) Learning Regulations
There are hundreds of FAA Regulations that govern how, where, and when you can fly. Some of them can be pretty confusing. As a student pilot, you’re just as responsible for adhering to the FARs as any fully certificated pilot. Keep yourself out of trouble and learn those regs!

4) Aerodynamics
A huge part of learning to fly is understanding the physics behind how it all works. But how can a strong foundation of aerodynamics save your life? One simple example is the lift to drag ratio for your airplane. At L/D max, or the best lift to drag ratio, you’ll find an approximate best glide speed.

5) Decoding Textual Weather
Whether it’s a METAR or PIREP, it’s your responsibility as a pilot to maintain your skills for decoding textual weather.
Need a refresher? Give our Aviation Weather Products course a try.

6) “Radio Talk”
Learning how to actively listen for your callsign in busy airspace with dozens of airplanes on-frequency is tough. Adding that to learning the correct verbiage provides quite the task for brand new student pilots. Here are some things you shouldn’t say over the radio.

7) Getting Into “School Mode”
First and foremost, getting your brain into a “school mode” can be tough, especially if you haven’t sat in a formal classroom setting in years. Learning to fly is undoubtedly fun, but there’s also a lot of work outside the cockpit.

10 Survival Tips That Kept Your Great-Grandparents Alive

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Unless you are fairly young, chances are your great-grandparents already have passed on. But if they were around in today’s tenuous times, our great-grandparents might have a few words of advice for us.

Survival was something most of our ancestors did well, and a few tips from their success could make a real difference in our lives today.

Our great-grandparents probably survived hard times due to a combination of the right skills and knowledge, the right priorities, and the right attitudes. Here is what they might say to us if they could:

Skills and Knowledge

1. Be able to acquire food by multiple means. Learn to grow vegetables, tend fruit and berry orchards, milk dairy cattle and goats, keep laying hens, raise meat animals, and hunt for wild game.

2. Know how to preserve food for leaner seasons by way of canning, smoking, drying and root-cellaring.

3. Learn to make all of your food from scratch, from bread to butter to noodles to jerky to cheese. Even if you do not do all of it annually, develop and keep up the skills.

4. Be able to repair and maintain what you use. Furniture, buildings, engines, equipment, shoes, toys, kitchen utensils—you name it. It is important to take meticulous care of your belongings and fix whatever needs fixing until it is beyond repair. Buy less, fix more.

5. Know how to treat minor injuries and illnesses at home. Sometimes seeking professional medical advice is the best course, but in a survival situation it is valuable to be able to assess and treat problems yourself if needed…

Written by: Kathy Bernier Extreme Survival [ repost: http://www.offthegridnews.com/extreme-survival/10-survival-tips-that-kept-your-great-grandparents-alive/ ] Unless you are fairly young, chances are your great-grandparents already have passed on. But if they were around in today’s tenuous times, our great-grandparents might have a few words of advice for us. Survival was something most of our ancestors did well, and a few […]

via — How to Provide

Smartphones, tablets and internet killing Irish marriages and family life

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Couple annoyed at each other after argumentCouple fighting

Forget affairs or simply falling out of love, technology is the biggest factor in the breakdown of Irish marriages, it’s claimed.

Family psychologist and UCD lecturer, Dr John Sharry, maintains the overuse of smartphones, tablets and the internet is having a devastating impact on relationships – and our sex lives.

Worryingly, our must-have gadgets are also ruining family life and the bonds between parents and their children.

Dr Sharry’s warnings are supported by counselling body Relationships Ireland, which claims 90% of couples seeking its help say technology is a big factor in their marriage troubles.

Read more: Four things that spell relationship trouble – and how you can avoid heading for the divorce courts.

Source: Smartphones, tablets and internet killing Irish marriages and family life, warns expert – Irish Mirror Online

Nature Has No Boss

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muskrat_4

A week or two ago on a Sunday morning just about at a time I would consider brunch time we watched this Muskrat repeatedly climb up and down the river bank picking mouthfuls of grass, carrying them back to the river, swimming along to his favorite spot and them munching away to their hearts content. […]

via Muskrat Brunch — nature has no boss

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