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Daily Stoic

Thanks to Daily Stoic for sharing…

The Stoics saw gratitude as a kind of medicine, that saying “Thank you” for every experience was the key to mental health. “Convince yourself that everything is the gift of the gods,” was how Marcus Aurelius put it, “that things are good and always will be.”…

…But we should also be grateful for the less obvious things: For the setbacks, for the squabbling habits of other people, for the stress they put on us and whatever other difficulties we might be experiencing. Why? Because we are only experiencing them because we are alive. Because they are a form of fuel for our philosophy. And as frustrating as they might be, it’s what Fortune chose for us and we might as well make the most of it.

Epictetus has said that every situation has two handles: Which are you going to decide to hold onto? The anger or the appreciation? The one of resentment or of thanks?…

[For a larger exercise in how to practice gratitude every day, you might like this article. And you can also read our message from last Thanksgiving, The Daily Art of Giving Thanks.]

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P.S. The Daily Stoic Journal: 366 Days of Writing and Reflection on the Art of Living is now available everywhere books are sold. And for more ways to keep Stoic principles in mind as you navigate your day, check out our Daily Stoic Store. It features our popular amor fatiand memento mori medallions, Marcus Aurelius print, and more.

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Give Your Loved Ones Wings to Fly…

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Give the ones you love wings to fly, roots to come back and reasons to stay. source: Dalai Lama XIV image: Eddie’s Images

via Wings To Fly — Eddie Two Hawks

Daily Stoic

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Daily Stoic

Thanks to Daily Stoic for sharing…

In America [and Europe], it’s Halloween, which is a fun holiday for children. In Mexico, however, it is the beginning of Día de los Muertos, a much more adult and philosophical holiday. All throughout Mexico, people will gather not to eat candy but to celebrate and remember their friends and family who have died. It is, in a sense, a three day commemoration of the idea of memento moria kind of collective bereavement mixed with the fun of a jazz funeral.

The great Montaigne would tell of a story that had trickled back to him from the New World, of an ancient drinking game where the members took turns holding up a painting of a corpse inside a coffin and cheered “Drink and be merry for when you’re dead you will look like this.” This cheeky but also profound observation captures the spirit of Día de los Muertos quite well with imagery of skulls and skeletons, the makeup and the music and the dancing, the praying and the altars set up to honor those who have left.

It might seem strange to celebrate death in this way, and stranger still to involve children in it. But is it really that stranger than banishing any thought of death from our lives and letting it return to us only as a dreaded nightmare? There is real value in taking time to process and grieve and dance with the morbidity of our mortality, of creating a ritual that allows us to come to terms with this essential part of our existence. Better to be on good terms with death and to schedule an annual check up than to be surprised and shocked by this enemy we pretend doesn’t exist.

So drink and be merry today and celebrate the day of the dead. Say goodbye to the people you have lost and enjoy the people you are lucky enough to still have with you. That’s all we can do.

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P.S. For more ways to keep Stoic principles in mind as you navigate your day, check out our Daily Stoic Store. It features our popular amor fati and memento mori medallions, Marcus Aurelius print, and more. Also, The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living is available everywhere books are sold.

Like this email? Forward it to a friend. And if it was forwarded to you, sign up for our free 7-day course on Stoicism, packed with exclusive resources.

 

Practice Being Mindful Discovering Your Happiness

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Many thanks to Practice Being Mindful — Discovering Your Happiness  for sharing…

There is a VERY BIG difference to being ‘mindful‘ compared to ‘mind full‘

I practice mindfulness because I know it gives me that ‘I can totally handle this even though everything is burning to the ground’ mindset. The only problem is that mindfulness isn’t always straightforward or easy to do. The hardest part is simply remembering to be mindful.

It’s easy to forget about mindfulness because of the craziness of our daily schedules…but that’s exactly when we need mindfulness. After all, mindfulness helps us make our days more calm and less stressful.

Struggling with mindfulness yourself? Here are five tips to make mindfulness easier so you can to integrate it into your daily life!

  1. CREATE OBVIOUS REMINDERS 

Make mindfulness easier by reminding yourself often. This could be through reminders on your phone telling you to be mindful or post-it notes left in places you’ll look frequently. You could even use something like a physical object to remind you to be mindful. For example, if there’s a candle you like, you can tell yourself to be present in the moment whenever you light it.

  1. MAKE IT A PRACTICE

Another way to make mindfulness easier is through a regular practice. Whether it’s yoga, meditation, or another form of mindfulness, getting into a routine will make mindfulness a whole lot easier. I find that using an app for meditation also makes this less daunting.

  1. REDUCE THE NOISE

In order to get more mindful, it’s important to remove the constant noise that distracts you from the present moment. I’m talking about all of the social media accounts you follow that don’t add any value to your life. Go on an unfollowing spree and give your brain a break from anything that causes you to compare yourself to others, doubt your self-worth, or grinds your gears. You can also unsubscribe from all of the newsletters you *magically* got subscribed to using unroll.me. (I honestly just unsubscribed to 114 companies that I no longer want to get emails from, best website evvvvvvvvver!)

  1. GET ON-BOARD WITH GRATITUDE

Taking some time each day to write what you’re grateful for is a great way to add more mindfulness into your routine. Try writing down three things you’re grateful for before you go to bed and when you wake up in the morning. Not only does this help shift a negative mindset, it also means you’re taking time to be more mindful about what’s good in your life.

  1. INTENTIONALLY PLAN YOUR DAY

Combine productivity and mindfulness by intentionally planning out your day.  One way to do this is to choose the top three things that must get done today. These are the things that are going to add the most value and purpose to your day. By doing this, you are being more mindful about your priorities, and you’re less likely to get distracted because you know exactly what you need to do.

Wherever you are in the world, have a lovely day

via Practice Being Mindful — Discovering Your Happiness

 

 ❤                A, x (1)

Self Care — friday

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Thanks to akagbrvanich –  Self-Care — friday.e.d for sharing…

the best way to be able to care for others is to start with yourself. self-care is good to your mental health, taking time to listen to what you need make you strong and knowing yourself better, it also can cope with stress. when you have no activity on in a long holiday, do this […]

via Self-Care — friday.e.d

Daily Stoic

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Daily Stoic

Thanks to Daily Stoic for sharing…

Daily Stoic

We asked Mike Duncan, whose podcasts History of Rome and Revolutions have done more than 100 million downloads and whose new book The Storm Before The Storm, was just released, why Stoicism seems to re-emerge when the world is in crisis.

His answer:

Anytime the world starts to feel like it’s being engulfed by entropy, chaos and noisy disunity, the mind naturally seeks out something that offers cohesion, order, and quiet unity. We can get carried away by events and certainly feel our passions leading us into behavior that we might upon reflection regret. Stoicism offers a solid place to plant your feet and say the winds may howl but I will not be swept away.

That’s a fantastic definition of the attitude the Stoic seeks to cultivate. The winds may howl but I will not be swept away.

(P.S. For more ways to keep Stoic principles in mind as you navigate your day, check out our Daily Stoic Store. jurisdictions features our popular amor fati and memento mori medallions, Marcus Aurelius print, and more. Also, The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living is available everywhere books are sold.

Like this email? Forward it to a friend. And if it was forwarded to you, sign up for our free 7-day course on Stoicism, packed with exclusive resources.

You can read the full interview here).

 

 

Daily Stoic

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Thanks to Daily Stoic for sharing 

There is a wonderful interview with David Letterman from earlier this year, where he talks about some of the transgressive policies aimed at transgendered people in America. He said,

Look, you’re a human, I’m a human. We’re breathing the same air. We have the same problems. We’re trying to get through our day. Who the fuck are you to throw a log in the road of somebody who has a different set of difficulties in life?

Which is a very Stoic way to look at just about every contentious issue in today’s culture regardless of whatever political, religious or scientific mindset you adhere to. Far left or far right, creationist or scientist, it doesn’t matter what your opinion of transgendered people, or immigrants, an opioid-addicted kid in Ohio happens to be or why you think they got where they are. The Stoic approach would be to say: We’re all humans. We all struggle and those people are almost certainly struggling harder than me. Why would we spend our time legislating or pontificating about their issues when we have our own, right here, that we haven’t dealt with? Why would I actively try to make their lives harder?

The Stoics held strongly to the idea of sympatheia, the interconnection between all species, people and universes. They believe we were all the same, all struggling under different versions of the same logos which assigned unique roles and trials for us all. Who are we to make other people’s fates harder? Who are we to punish other people for things they don’t control—for things that have nothing to do with their behavior?

Don’t throw a log in front of someone else. Leave them alone. Or better, do the Stoic thing—offer a hand.

P.S. For more ways to keep Stoic principles in mind as you navigate your day, check out ourDaily Stoic Store. It features our popular amor fati and memento mori medallions, Marcus Aurelius print, and more. Also, The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living is available everywhere books are sold.

Like this email? Forward it to a friend. And if it was forwarded to you, sign up for our free 7-day course on Stoicism, packed with exclusive resources.

 

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