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5 Rules of Thumb Every Pilot Should Know Boldmethod

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Source: 5 Rules-of-Thumb Every Pilot Should Know | Boldmethod

5 Rules of Thumb Every Pilot Should Know  Colin Cutler

1) Estimating Your Crosswind Component

When you’re on the ground, it’s easy to use the crosswind chart in your POH, or an E6B. But when you’re in the air, neither of those options are very practical.

Lucky of all of us, there’s an easier way. If the wind is 30 degrees off the runway, your crosswind component is about 50% of the wind speed.

If the wind is 45 degrees off the runway, the crosswind component is about 75% of the wind speed.

And if the wind is 60 degrees or more off the runway, the crosswind component is roughly the same as the total wind.

crosswind component

2) 10% Weight Increase = 20% Takeoff and Landing Distance Increase

The more weight you have, the more runway you need. And while this rule is far from exact, it gets you in the ball park for a normally aspirated plane.

Obviously, when it comes time to calculate your actual performance, you’ll want to pull out your POH.

distance weight

3) Takeoff roll increases about 10% for every additional 1,000 feet of density altitude

For most normally-aspirated airplanes, you add about 10% of takeoff roll distance for every 1,000′ of density altitude (DA).

For example, in Denver, with an increase of 3,200′ of density altitude, you’d increase your takeoff roll by about 32%.

So if you have a 1,500′ takeoff roll on a standard day in Denver (3 degrees C), you’ll increase that roll to almost 2,000′ on a 30C day.

Denver-Takeoff

4) When Should You Start Your Descent?

3 degrees is a comfortable descent rate in just about any aircraft. But when you’re approaching an airport, how do you know when to start down?

Divide the altitude you need to lose by 300.

For example, if you’re at 11,000′, and you need to get down to a pattern altitude of 2,000′, you need to descend 9,000′.

9,000/300 = 30 miles.

If you start a 3-degree descent 30 miles out, you’ll hit pattern altitude as you reach the airport. Keep in mind, you’ll want to add a few miles on to your number, so you hit pattern altitude slightly before you get to the airport.

1-degree-descent

5) ILS Course Width

VFR pilots can make good use of the ILS too. Whether it’s a dark moonless night, or a long straight-in on a hazy day, following the ILS to your runway keeps you safe from terrain and obstructions (not to mention, you know you’re lined up with the right runway).

The closer you get to the runway, the more sensitive the signal is. As you cross the threshold, 1/2 dot deflection on the localizer = about 1/2 the runway width. So if you’re a half dot off as you approach the runway, you’re going to be looking at the runway edge lights.

ils-loc

What are other rules-of-thumb do you use? Tell us in the comments below.

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Brilliant Pictures…

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Just a Brilliant Picture…

Common Yellow Throat

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Thanks to TPJphoto.net for sharing…

Common Yellow Throat - click to enlarge

I’m pretty sure this is a Yellow Throat, but this is the first time I have photographed one. A very pretty bird.

via Common Yellow Throat — TPJphoto.net

Happiness…NOW! — Welcome to Wales [Croeso i Gymru]

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Happy is Now…

Thanks to Croeso i Gymru for sharing

IMG_1576

“Happiness – not in another place but THIS place. 

Not for another hour, but THIS hour.”

Walt Whitman

Happiness can only be found in the present moment.  There’s no need to wait for it.  Grab the moment NOW! 

That’s what I did when the sun came out on a cold, frosty morning yesterday.

The simple things in life bring the most happiness.

Photos:  A beautiful sunshine day at Acton Park, Wrexham, North Wales  24th November 2017

via Happiness…NOW! — Welcome to Wales [Croeso i Gymru]

On Mindfulness

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Thanks to Hilary Illick for sharing…

 

How much time do you spend living in present time? Think about it.

The syndrome of regret and fret has our minds bouncing back and forth from the past to the future like a ping pong ball. Perhaps we touch down for brief intervals in the present, The Now. More likely, however, we sail right past what’s actually happening in this moment as if The Now were the net on the pingpong table and we are the bouncing ball.

The mind does not know the difference between a real and imagined scenario. This is what makes anxiety so compelling. If you fear the plane is crashing every time it hits turbulence, and your mind supplies you with scary images, you are not only not in present time (where in fact the plane is fine, just bouncing its way through choppy air currents), but you are activating the stress hormones of adrenaline and cortisol. As if the plane were actually going down. How many life-or-death scenarios (that in fact weren’t life-or-death) have you actually lived through? Dreaded? What has the toll of this been on your body? Your experience of life? Your wellbeing? […].

Here’s the good news: we happen to live inside of our very own mindfulness kit. Our body. One quick mindfulness practice is to tune into our five senses. Focusing on the five senses brings us back to our body–which lives right here, right now, in the present.

via On Mindfulness — Hilary Illick

Daily Stoic – What are you worried about

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Daily Stoic

Thanks to Daily Stoic for sharing this great post

What are you worried about right now?

Your job?

Your family?

Your future?

Your health?

You’re not crazy to worry. Bad things could happen related to any of them. A car accident. An economic downturn. A surprise diagnosis.

But let’s go backwards in time a month, a year, five years. What were you worried about then? Mostly the same things, right?

And how many of those worries came to pass? And the ones that did…clearly the worrying didn’t help stop it, right?

It was Seneca who put the best one-liner to this feeling: “We are more often frightened than hurt; and we suffer more from imagination than from reality.”

It’s too facile to say don’t worry. But put your worries in perspective. Don’t let your worries grow out of proportion to what might actually happen. Don’t let imagination overtake reality. And for god’s sake, don’t conflate worrying with prevention or preparation…because you have a clear track record to show you how silly that is.

***

Like this email? Forward it to a friend. And if it was forwarded to you, sign up for our free 7-day course on Stoicism, packed with exclusive resources.

STOP THINKING AND START LIVING!!!

MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR…

Give Your Loved Ones Wings to Fly…

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Give the ones you love wings to fly, roots to come back and reasons to stay. source: Dalai Lama XIV image: Eddie’s Images

via Wings To Fly — Eddie Two Hawks

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